Police Urged To Break Post-election Violence Cycle

In a statement, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken urged "a peaceful and transparent democratic process, which is critical to delivering a more prosperous and secure future for all Kenyans."

Human rights activists and the international community have publicly stated that they are closely monitoring Kenyan police conduct during this election season, arguing that their actions are critical to causing or averting violence.

This year’s elections have been described as critical, and international players are watching to see if Kenya has moved on from a pattern of post-election violence, particularly the post-election violence in 2007/2008, which nearly tore the country apart.

A six-month-old baby named Pendo was bludgeoned to death during protests in Kisumu in 2017 following the highly disputed elections that saw the then NASA Presidential candidate (Raila Odinga) withdraw from the race after the Apex Court invalidated the first round presidential results. At the time, police were heavily concentrated in cities such as Nairobi, Kericho, Nakuru, Kisumu, Uasin Gishu, and Mombasa that were thought to be potential hotspots.

The same six counties have been identified by the National Cohesion and Integration Commission (NCIC) as those most likely to experience violence during the election. Violence has previously been brought on by hate speech, fake news, and refusal to accept election results in these communities.

The US has joined the calls for peace and urged Kenyans to take advantage of the chance to show off their democracy to the world by casting their votes in the country’s elections.

In a statement, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken urged “a peaceful and transparent democratic process, which is critical to delivering a more prosperous and secure future for all Kenyans.”

The announcement came shortly after the US Embassy in Nairobi, which drew a lot of criticism, issued an alert restricting the movement of its staff and citizens in Kisumu County due to potential violence.

Later, it clarified that it had no specific intelligence about violence and was simply warning employees not to visit one of its outposts in the country at this time.

However, human rights organizations claim that police could have an impact on post-election events. According to the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNHCR), based on previous highly competitive elections, violence is likely to occur in the strongholds of the top candidates as tensions rise over the results.

Police Urged To Break Post-election Violence Cycle

Human rights activists and the international community have publicly stated that they are closely monitoring Kenyan police conduct during this election season, arguing that their actions are critical to causing or averting violence.

This year’s elections have been described as critical, and international players are watching to see if Kenya has moved on from a pattern of post-election violence, particularly the post-election violence in 2007/2008, which nearly tore the country apart.

A six-month-old baby named Pendo was bludgeoned to death during protests in Kisumu in 2017 following the highly disputed elections that saw the then NASA Presidential candidate (Raila Odinga) withdraw from the race after the Apex Court invalidated the first round presidential results. At the time, police were heavily concentrated in cities such as Nairobi, Kericho, Nakuru, Kisumu, Uasin Gishu, and Mombasa that were thought to be potential hotspots.

The same six counties have been identified by the National Cohesion and Integration Commission (NCIC) as those most likely to experience violence during the election. Violence has previously been brought on by hate speech, fake news, and refusal to accept election results in these communities.

The US has joined the calls for peace and urged Kenyans to take advantage of the chance to show off their democracy to the world by casting their votes in the country’s elections.

In a statement, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken urged “a peaceful and transparent democratic process, which is critical to delivering a more prosperous and secure future for all Kenyans.”

The announcement came shortly after the US Embassy in Nairobi, which drew a lot of criticism, issued an alert restricting the movement of its staff and citizens in Kisumu County due to potential violence.

Later, it clarified that it had no specific intelligence about violence and was simply warning employees not to visit one of its outposts in the country at this time.

However, human rights organizations claim that police could have an impact on post-election events. According to the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNHCR), based on previous highly competitive elections, violence is likely to occur in the strongholds of the top candidates as tensions rise over the results.