Stop Popping Banned Chinese Contraceptive Pill

According to Dr. Albert Ndwiga, the manager of the Ministry of Health's National Family Planning Programme, there is no family planning method that involves taking a pill once a month.

Kenyan women have been advised not to use a banned Chinese oral contraceptive pill because it is harmful to their health.

According to Dr. Albert Ndwiga, the manager of the Ministry of Health’s National Family Planning Programme, there is no family planning method that involves taking a pill once a month.

“If you see anyone distributing these pills, please warn them; they are extremely dangerous.” They have serious consequences for unborn children. They are marketed as Chinese herbal medicines,” he warns, adding that half of the women who use the method become pregnant.

Sophia, a drug that was banned in Kenya ten years ago, has since resurfaced on the market, marketed as a natural herbal product with no side effects.

Samples collected and tested by the Ministry of Health, on the other hand, revealed that the product is toxic and has a severe impact on the user.

The National Quality Control Laboratory analysis that led to the pill’s ban ten years ago discovered it had abnormally high levels of the hormones levonorgestrel and quinestrol, the active ingredients in conventional contraceptive pills.

According to the Pharmacy and Poisons Board’s findings, the pill contains 40 times the recommended level of levonorgestrel and quinestrol.

Furthermore, the pills contained up to 3000mcg of estradiol, which was 100 times the recommended dosage. The recommended daily dose is 30mcg. The results revealed varying amounts of the active ingredients, with some pills being useless.

Excess estradiol, an oestrogen analogue, increases the risk of blood clots and heart disease.

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